Escalator of fail at Southern Cross Station

How long does it take to fix a failed escalator? For the management of Southern Cross Station this has become a chance to set a new world record, after the escalator linking the Bourke Street Bridge to Spencer Street broke down back in early November.

November 5.

Failed escalator linking the Bourke Street Bridge to Spencer Street

November 10.

Failed escalator linking the Bourke Street Bridge to Spencer Street

November 24.

Escalator linking the Bourke Street Bridge to Spencer Street is still broken

December 29.

Escalator linking the Bourke Street Bridge to Spencer Street is still broken

January 9.

Escalator linking the Bourke Street Bridge to Spencer Street is still broken

January 29.

Escalator linking the Bourke Street Bridge to Spencer Street is still broken

How many more months until this escalator finally gets repaired?

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Southern Cross Station has a long history of failure – back in 2012 there was a plague of failing floor tiles, with escalators joining the club soon after.

In 2012 I first noticed hefty timber barriers being used to prevent passengers from trying to use failed escalators.

'Escalator out of order - use stairs'. What stairs?

Despite their size, the barriers could be disassembled into smaller components, ready to be moved to the next failed escalator.

Escalator under planned maintenance at Southern Cross Station platform 11 and 12

By 2015 the barriers had been so frequently used they needed a repaint and some new signage.

Escalator under repair at Southern Cross platform 9 and 10

But that wasn’t enough, so by 2017 the signs were replaced a second time.

Escalator under planned maintenance at Southern Cross Station platform 11 and 12

Which was a good thing, given the signs were getting more of a workout.

Broken down escalator linking the main Spencer Street entry to the suburban concourse

Popping up around the station on an increasingly frequent basis.

Failed escalator at Southern Cross platform 9 and 10

And why are they breaking anyway?

North Melbourne Station also has a reputation for failing escalators – my theory being that undersized units were originally installed, leading to premature failure. Given that the rest of Southern Cross Station is almost at design capacity, could this be the same case here?

Footnote

Turns out I photographed the very same escalator under repair back in June 2016.

Failed escalator to the Bourke Street bridge under repair at Southern Cross

Unfortunately I can’t remember how long it took to get fixed last time.

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8 Responses to “Escalator of fail at Southern Cross Station”

  1. Natural_Justice says:

    The least they could do is stick one of those “Play Me I’m Yours” pianos in front of it! They’re a similar shape

  2. Beren says:

    The good thing about these, is that they were installed in sets of 3 meaning no disruption to passengers. And in my opinion, these escalators need to be maintained due to the high level of use. So, what I see happening here, is even if there is no reason to service the escalators, I believe they will essentially take at least one set offline for servicing. It’s a good practice and not really a sign that anything is going wrong. Generally escalators need regular servicing.

  3. Jordan says:

    Why don’t they just leave the escalator idle when it’s broken instead of blocking it off. other stations around Melbourne do this.

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