Daniel Andrews, Merry Christmas and Wikimedia Commons

It was the day before Christmas, and Daniel Andrews’ social media team shared a ‘Free Public Transport on Christmas Day’ post.

My first through – I’ve seen that photo of a V/Line train before – I uploaded it to Wikipedia a decade ago.

So where did the other photos come from? The Z3 class tram looked familiar – Wikipedia again.

And the bus – another photo via Wikipedia.

But as for the source of the X’Trapolis train photo – I’ve come up blank – if only they’d followed the Creative Commons licence

You are free:

  • to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work
  • to remix – to adapt the work

Under the following conditions:

  • attribution – You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
  • share alike – If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you must distribute your contributions under the same or compatible license as the original.

And through the looking glass

If you take a close look at the original photo on Wikipedia, you’ll notice a green advertisement for Monteith’s apple cider.

Which has been photoshopped out of the ‘Free Public Transport on Christmas Day’ post – replaced by a panel of PTV green triangles.

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4 Responses to “Daniel Andrews, Merry Christmas and Wikimedia Commons”

  1. Andrew says:

    I at times don’t attribute photos, but the more personal they are and not already shared, or all over the internet, the more likely I am likely to note who took the photo. FB can be very problematic for working out who took the original photo. That a government department does as they have with your photos is outrageous, and as I am sure you know, the same has happened with Daniel’s photos.

  2. David says:

    Funny how politicians say ‘we’ as in they are providing something. Really, they should say ‘you’ because all of us are paying for it.

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