Melbourne’s triply inaccessible tram stops

The inaccessibility of Melbourne’s tram network is well known, thanks to hundreds of high floor trams still making up the fleet and modern low floor trams still using old fashioned street level tram stops. However there is a handful of tram stops that have a third level of inaccessibility – the only way to access them is a flight of steps.

B2.2089 picks up a citybound route 64 passenger in the median strip of Queens Way

Stop 31 Queens Way, Windsor

Stop 31 on route 5 and 64 is located in the middle of Queens Way.

Z3.123 heads east on route 5 along the median strip of Queens Way

The tram stop consisting of two narrow strips of concrete linked by a pedestrian crossing.

Tram stop in the median strip of Queens Way

And the only connection to the rest of the world being a single flight of stairs to the Upton Road overpass.

Steps down to the Queens Way tram stop from Upton Road

The tram stop opened in 1969 as part of the St Kilda Junction project, which saw 2 kilometres of tram track along Wellington Street relocated to the current grade separated alignment at a cost of $458,000.

Stop 33 Hornby Street/Dandenong Road, Windsor

Only a short distance away on route 5 and 64 is another tram stop only accessed via steps.

B2.2023 heads west on route 64 along Dandenong Road, Windsor

Again the tram stop is just two narrow concrete strips, linked by a pedestrian crossing.

Footbridge provides the only pedestrian access to the Hornby Street tram stop in the middle of Dandenong Road, Windsor

A pedestrian bridge crosses the eight lanes of Dandenong Road, with two flights of steps connecting it to the tram stop.

Footbridge provides the only pedestrian access to the Hornby Street tram stop in the middle of Dandenong Road, Windsor

Agitation for a safe crossing location of Dandenong Road between Hornby and Westbury streets commenced in the 1970s, with local member D. G. Elliot raising the issue in parliament in 1973.

The current three span, 59 metres long by 1.8 metres wide prestressed and reinforced concrete beam bridge was completed in 1976 by the Country Roads Board as part of the ‘grade-separated crossings to serve schools’ program.

Stop 63 Deakin University/Burwood Highway, Burwood

The outer end of the route 75 runs in the middle of Burwood Highway, and outside the Deakin University campus in Burwood is an inaccessible platform tram stop.

B2.2033 heads east on route 75 along Burwood Highway at Deakin University

A pedestrian crossing links the citybound and outbound platform stops.

Pedestrian crossing links the citybound and outbound platforms at the Deakin University tram stop

But the only way out is via the pedestrian underpass.

Signage directing tram passengers to the Burwood Highway pedestrian underpass at Deakin University

Accessed via a single narrow flight of steps.

Single set of steps down the Deakin University tram stop to the Burwood Highway pedestrian underpass

Leading to a thankfully well lit underpass.

Burwood Highway pedestrian underpass leading to the Deakin University tram stop

The northern end entering the Deakin University campus.

Second pedestrian underpass runs beneath Deakin University gate 2

And the southern end disappearing into a small park.

Southern entry to the Burwood Highway pedestrian underpass leading to the Deakin University tram stop

The pedestrian underpass opened in 1978 as part of the East Burwood tramway extension from Warrigal Road to Middleborough Road, the remainder of the tram stops having been provided with a pedestrian crossing for access.

By 2005 the underpass was described as dirty and poorly-lit.

Whitehorse Leader
Move for safe crossing
20/04/2005
Jan Harkin

Students are dangerously dodging Burwood Highway traffic to avoid a dirty, poorly-lit underpass near a tram stop outside Deakin University, Burwood state Labor MP Bob Stensholt says.

“If you stand there at four o’clock and watch the students, they come across the road like Brown’s cows,” Mr Stensholt said.

Mr Stensholt said the long-term plan was for a superstop with an enhanced pedestrian crossing and lights although that would not happen before 2007.

But a meeting of university, VicRoads and Yarra Trams representatives has come up with short-term measures to improve pedestrian safety.

Yarra Trams will upgrade the stop with extra safety rails and VicRoads will tackle the underpass.

“They are going to extend the railings as a temporary measure and put some signage on to tell people to be careful and hopefully put in more lighting,” Mr Stensholt said.

But in the years since a ‘enhanced pedestrian crossing’ has never happened – but the current pair of ‘accessible’ platforms were provided in May 2007.

Grade separated – but thankfully accessible

On route 70 there are three grade separated tram stops serving the spots precinct, but thankfully all are accessible.

Stop 7A William Barak Bridge/Melbourne Park has steps and a lift.

A2.271 heads west on route 70 at Exhibition Street and Batman Avenue

Stop 7B Rod Laver Arena/MCG Gates 1-3 has a loooong ramp to each platform.

B2.2027 passes Rod Laver Arena with an outbound route 70 service

And stop 7C 7C-MCG Gates 4-7/John Cain Arena has stairs and lifts.

A2.271 westbound on route 70 at the Hisense Arena stop

All three tram stops opened in 1999 as part of the rerouting of route 70 trams onto a new reserved track to the Exhibition Street extension, freeing up the previous route via Swan Street and Batman Avenue to make way for the Federation Square project.

And since removed

Stop 14 on St Kilda Road at the Arts Centre once had a set of stairs connecting it to the City Road underpass – opened in 1971 it was replaced by the current ground level tram stop in 2008.

Footnote: close, but not quite on route 59

Route 59 has a number of tram stops beside the Tullamarine Freeway.

Paralleling the Tullamarine Freeway and Matthews Road in Airport West, B2.2056 with an outbound route 59 service

A footbridge crosses the freeway at each tram stop.

Paralleling the Tullamarine Freeway and Matthews Road in Airport West, B2.2056 with an outbound route 59 service

But the tram stops themselves are not connected – access is via a pedestrian crossing.

B2.2088 arrives into a platform stop between the Tullamarine Freeway and Matthews Road in Airport West

St Kilda Junction

The St Kilda Junction tram stop is surrounded by cars.

Z3.217 heads south on route 64 at St Kilda Junction

Served by a maze of pedestrian underpasses.

Headed into the dark and dingy tram stop underpass at St Kilda Junction

Running beneath the surrounding roads.

Dark and dingy tram stop underpass at St Kilda Junction

But thankfully there are no steps – just steep ramps.

Headed into the dark and dingy tram stop underpass at St Kilda Junction

And there is one ground level access route – a pedestrian crossing at the Punt Road / St Kilda Road traffic lights.


Google Street View

And two aborted proposals

Early plans for the Metro Tunnel featured direct access between trams and trains on Royal Parade at Parkville station.

Parkville, artists impression of station entrances

As well as the Domain Interchange tram stop on St Kilda Road as Domain station.

Domain station, trio of entrances at the corner of St Kilda and Domain Roads

But direct tram stop access at Parkville station has been dropped from the current plans.

But thankfully at the renamed Anzac station, plans show the main station entrance is connected to the tram stop.

With a total of three station entrances – one either side of St Kilda Road, and a third between the tram tracks, with a large atrium looking down on the station concourse below.

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6 Responses to “Melbourne’s triply inaccessible tram stops”

  1. kurt says:

    The Domain station plans do still feature escalators and lifts to an island tram interchange don’t they?

  2. Malcolm M says:

    Ever seen anyone use the footbridge over the Tullarmarine Freeway to connect from tram 59 to a flight from Essendon? I did it once about 12 years ago with baggage, but have never seen anyone else do so.

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