Posts Tagged ‘DDA compliance’

Belt and braces – why Melbourne stations have lifts and ramps

Last week I detailed the accident of history that saw ramps being favoured over stairs on Melbourne’s railway network, despite the absence of any requirement to provide easy access for people with disabilities. So how has the network developed since then, and why have a combination of lifts and ramps become the current standard? Entering […]

Why Melbourne built ramps not stairs at railway stations

In your travels by train around Melbourne, you might have noticed something – the vast majority of stations are accessed via ramps, not stairs. This is reinforced by the current version of the Public Transport Victoria network map, which states – “Step free access at all stations except Heyington”. This sounds like quite a win for accessibility, and the result of years of hard and diligent work – but in reality it is just an accident of history based on the way that Melbourne’s rail network was built.

Ramp between platform and street at Ascot Vale station

V/Line overcomplicate the toilet door

Doors are a simple thing, having existed for hundreds of years. So how did V/Line manage to overcomplicate a door so much, that a three step instruction manual and regular audio announcements were required?

'Ensure your privacy' signage inside the disabled toilet onboard a VLocity train

Categorising the Melbourne tram network by environment

Melbourne’s tram network is one of the biggest in the world, with 24 routes traversing 250 kilometres of track, dating back over a century, and progressively extended and upgraded in the years since.

Today the challenge is to keep services moving despite increasing traffic congestion, carrying more passengers than ever before, while meeting new accessible transport standards. This is difficult activity given no two parts of the network are the same – so how can the Melbourne tram network be categorised by the environment they runs through?

Z3.202 headed north on Swanston and Flinders Street

Poor planning replacing the City Loop lifts

All infrastructure eventually wears out, and in the case of Melbourne the thirty year old lifts in the City Loop have come up for replacement. However the planning of these works leaves a lot to be desired.

Lift linking Flagstaff station to the street closed for total replacement