Posts Tagged ‘level crossings’

Identifying Melbourne railway stations by colour

The other day my 2.5 year old son added a station platform to his train set, and told me “red station is Footscray, green is West Footscray, yellow is Sunshine, and blue is Parliament”. So how does colour get used at Melbourne railway stations? It appears my son has been paying a lot of attention […]

Photos from ten years ago: January 2008

Another instalment in my photos from ten years ago series – this time it is January 2008. We start in the Geelong suburb of North Shore, where I found a Y class locomotive shunting a rake of loaded log wagons into the Midway wood chipping plant. The logs were sourced from native forests in East […]

Why Melbourne built ramps not stairs at railway stations

In your travels by train around Melbourne, you might have noticed something – the vast majority of stations are accessed via ramps, not stairs. This is reinforced by the current version of the Public Transport Victoria network map, which states – “Step free access at all stations except Heyington”. This sounds like quite a win for accessibility, and the result of years of hard and diligent work – but in reality it is just an accident of history based on the way that Melbourne’s rail network was built.

Ramp between platform and street at Ascot Vale station

Closing roads to remove level crossings

There are many ways to remove a level crossing – with closing the road being the easiest. An example can be found in Terang, a town of 1,800 people located on the Melbourne-Warrnambool railway line in south-west Victoria.

Former Simpson Street level crossing in Terang

Passengers stuck waiting at pedestrian crossings

One point often missed regarding level crossing is that rail passengers also get stuck waiting at them – leaving them stuck on the wrong side of the tracks and missing the train they were trying to catch. An example of this is Yarraville station, as I found a few years ago.

Crowd of passengers abandoning the platform at Yarraville, after an announcement that no trains were running